Stainless Steel Crowns

Stainless steel crowns: These are temporary, hollow caps made of stainless steel and mostly recommended for pediatric use. It is applied on the primary teeth to prevent it from decaying and when it falls off to give space for the growth of permanent teeth, the crown also falls off.

How do they work?

Why use stainless steel crowns?

Stainless steel crowns are used as an alternative to silver and tooth-coloured fillings. These strong metal caps cover the entire tooth and are hard to lose or damage. They have a smooth polished surface which makes them easy to clean and most last four years or more.

  • are very durable, wear well and are retentive.
  • The time for placement is fast compared to other techniques.
  • are simple to apply (similar to a regular filling).
  • may offer an alternative to removing a decayed tooth
  • contain only safe metals

The stainless steel crown (SSC) is an extremely durable restoration with several clear-cut indications for use in primary teeth including: following a pulpotomy/pulpectomy; for teeth with developmental defects or large carious lesions involving multiple surfaces where an amalgam is likely to fail; and for fractured teeth. In other situations, its use is less clear cut, and caries risk factors, restoration longevity and cost effectiveness are considerations in decisions to use the SSC. The literature on caries risk factors in young children indicates that children at high risk exhibiting anterior tooth decay and/or molar caries may benefit by treatment with stainless steel crowns to protect the remaining at-risk tooth surfaces. Studies evaluating restoration longevity, including the durability and lifespan of SSCs and Class II amalgams demonstrate the superiority of SSCs for both parameters. Children with extensive decay, large lesions or multiple surface lesions in primary molars should be treated with stainless steel crowns. Because of the protection from future decay provided by their feature of full coverage and their increased durability and longevity, strong consideration should be given to the use of SSCs in children who require general anesthesia. Finally, a strong argument for the use of the SSC restoration is its cost effectiveness based on its durability and longevity.

%

Americans age 35 to 44 have at least one missing tooth

%

over the age of 74 have lost ALL their natural teeth.

%

Success rate, and give you all the function and look of your natural teeth.

Many options exist to replace missing teeth but only one – dental implants – provides the feel, function and appearance of natural teeth.